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Call for papers: 5th European Conference for Critical Animal Studies (Lund, Sweden)

NONHUMAN ANIMALS IN SOCIETY: EXPLORING NEW PATHWAYS FOR RESISTANCE, CHANGE AND ACCOMODATION, 5th European Conference for Critical Animal Studies

International conference at Lund University, the Pufendorf Institute

Hosted by the European Association for Critical Animal Studies

The 26th to 28th of October 2017

Keynote Speakers:

  • Zipporah Weisberg, independent scholar
  • Volker Sommer, professor of Evolutionary Anthropology.

Conference Website: https://animalsconferencelund.wordpress.com

CALL FOR PAPERS

Historically, nonhuman animals have been placed outside the realm of society and the social. Often relegated to being part of ‘nature,’ nonhuman animals are often represented as the passive and subordinate counterpart of ‘culture’. These social constructions and representation of other animals have contributed to the sustainment of human supremacy and dominance, which until this day permeate the conditions of nonhuman animals in society. Over the past decades, a growing body of literature, cultural texts and scholarly work has dealt critically with the devaluation and misrepresentation of other animals. Influenced by “the animal turn” in the humanities and social sciences, this scholarship has examined both the presence and absence, the visibility and invisibility of nonhuman animals in society. By means of highlighting the social nature of these representations, work has been done to render nonhuman animal resistance, and change more visible. Additionally, with recent developments within scientific disciplines such as ethology, a new focus of research, one that highlights the individuality and agency of nonhuman animals has emerged. This contributes to an altered view on nonhuman animals, whether they are living within or in the periphery of human societies.

The aim of this conference is to bring to focus how scholarly work can contribute to the disruption and replacement of violent and exploitative practices, while also providing a platform for exploring the variety of ways that more just inter-species relations might be established. Special attention will be given to how scholarships and transdisciplinary work can engage with these problems as they exist in media, politics, popular culture and other aspects of everyday life.

On October 26th to 28th 2017, the 5th European Conference for Critical Animal Studies will be hosted by the European Association for Critical Animal Studies (EACAS).

The conference invites scholars and activists from all disciplines dealing with the three broad and intersecting themes, society, media and culture, and how they are assessed in Critical Animal Studies.

The conference welcomes proposals from a variety of scholars and disciplines, including radical academics, independent researchers, students and community activists. Papers may focus on any aspect of the three stands, including but not limited to the following themes:

  • Nonhuman animals and media
  • Nonhuman animals and culture
  • Culture – nature-dualism and its criticism
  • Nonhuman animals and social theory
  • Nonhuman animals and critical theory
  • Social Justice and nonhuman animals
  • Ethology and societal perception of animals
  • Normative aspects of animals in media and culture
  • The political principles of animal liberation
  • The construction of just interspecies institutions.
  • The politics and political theory of interspecies co-existence at farm sanctuaries
  • Histories and genealogies of multispecies politics and communities
  • Nonhuman animals and agency
  • Nonhuman animals and social classes
  • Nonhuman animals and colonialism
  • Animal liberation and anarchism
  • Animal liberation as a social movement
  • Nonhuman animals and feminism
  • Nonhuman animals and ableism
  • Nonhuman animals and critical race studies

The conference encourages the emancipatory approach of scholar activists in the field of critical animal studies.

Please note that there will be a 40€ registration fee for the conference. Registration for students, unemployed people or individuals with a low income will be 20€.

Prospective speakers are invited to submit abstracts of 500 words, and a brief biography including name, affiliation and contact details.

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 28th April 2017

Decisions on abstracts: 22nd May 2017

For more information about the conference, or to submit an abstract, please email the organising committee: animalsconferencelund@gmail.com

https://animalsconferencelund.wordpress.com

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CFP: Workshop: Empathy, Animals, Film

Call for participation and papers for phd candidates and postdocs

Workshop: Empathy, Animals, Film

With Prof. Lori Gruen (Wesleyan University)

International workshop at the University of Basel, June 20, 2017

Guest: Lori Gruen (Convenors: Markus Wild, Friederike Zenker, Livia Boscardin)

Registration Deadline: April 30, 2017

20/21–24 June 2017, the annual conference of the SLSAeu will be held in Basel on the topic of “Empathies” (http://www.empathies2017.com).

In this context, the workshop provides a forum to explore concepts of empathy with regard to animals and especially animals on film.

Empathy is a key concept in contemporary studies focussing on animals e.g. in Animal Ethics or research on Animal Minds. Humans and other animals engage with each other by means of empathy. The understanding thereby ranges from a cognitive ability to put oneself into the shoes of the other to more basic forms of immediate affective resonance. In our workshop, we are particularly keen to discuss Lori Gruen’s idea of ‘Entangled Empathy’. The aim is to bring together the thinking about entangled empathy and cinematic images of animals. In which ways do films contribute to empathetic engagement, respectively might refuse to do so? In a critique of traditional ethic theory, Gruen emphasizes how important the idea of particular animals, cases and contexts is for an alternative model of ethics. Accordingly, we would like to explore the transformative power of particular animals that become visible on film, as well as possible limits of the filmic medium.

We would like to address questions such as: 1) What is specific about empathy towards animals? How do animals engage empathically with humans? 2) What, if any, are the moral values of empathy? What is the moral value of specific concepts of empathy, e.g. entangled empathy? 3) How can we relate concepts of empathy to experiences with animals on film? How does the medium of film – particular films, scenes, cinematic narratives etc. – contribute to the empathic engagement of viewers?

PhD candidates and early postdocs from fields including, but not limited to, philosophy, anthropology, human-animal-studies, cultural studies, film studies and media studies are encouraged to participate. To apply for participation, please submit both a short CV and a short letter of motivation.

Participants who wish to discuss their own work are encouraged to submit a short abstract of their presentation (1 page). Be prepared to give a 15-min presentation. We invite submissions concerning the work of Lori Gruen (e.g. discussions of the concept of entangled empathy and related topics) and/or the topic of animals in visual media. The conference language is English.

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Please hand in all documents electronically to Friederike Zenker: The deadline for submissions is April 30, 2017.  Notice of acceptance or rejection will be announced on May 12, 2017. For questions or further information please contact Friederike Zenker

Contact

Friederike Zenker friederike.zenker@unibas.ch

University of Basel / eikones NFS Bildkritik / Rheinsprung 11 / CH – 4051 Basel

CfHAS conference Cfp: Animals and Social Change | 29 – 30th June 2017 | Liverpool, UK.

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CfHAS conference Cfp: Animals and Social Change | 29 – 30th June 2017 | Liverpool, UK.

CfHAS will host a conference on the theme of animals and social change in June 2017. We invite submissions that address these questions:

  • What constitutes effective social change for other animals?
  • How do particular framings of animal ethics and veganism shape strategies for intervention and change?
  • How do the worlds of animal advocacy and academic research on human-animal relations speak to each other? Could more come from those interactions?
  • What role do visual media, the online vegan community and documentary film-making play in effecting social change?
  • How do different communities imagine progressive social change for animals taking place?

We are interested in receiving submissions of academic papers (20 minutes), short films (any genre) and poster presentations. This conference will include paper and poster presentations, film screenings and a workshop session focused on strategies for social change involving dialogue between academics, activists and advocates. The conference is designed to facilitate time and space for discussion.

This conference will be of interest to those working in critical animal studies, advocacy, grassroots activism, animal media and the vegan business community.

Please submit abstracts to: cfhas@edgehill.ac.uk

Closing date for abstracts: 1st March 2017

The Centre for Human-Animal Studies (CfHAS) was formed in October 2014 during its inaugural conference held in Liverpool and the Edge Hill campus. CfHAS is an interdisciplinary forum for research and activities that engage with the complex material, ethical and symbolic relationships between humans and other animals.  The Centre acts as a hub for research. It has established links and collaborations with colleagues in Australia, New Zealand and Canada, and with the broader academic and advocacy community in the UK.

Environmental ethics in V4 countries (conference)

The conference aims to create a space for discussion of experts from the V4 countries on current issues concerning environmental ethics. The V4 countries share a similar socialist past which influenced the perceived value of environment still underestimated by many and seen as a mere source of raw materials. Proposed themes:

  •     Animal Rights and Ethics

Despite some legislative changes currently we still face the problem of insufficient reflection on the moral status and rights of animals. In this context it is important to deal with such kind of problems: What should our responsibilities be towards animals? Are animals and humans equal? Do we have to grant to (all) animals moral status?

  • Nature and Culture, Environmental Ethics in Relation to Science

Many refer to scientific and technological progress as the cause of the present ecological crisis. What should our attitude be towards science and technology in the context of the ecological crisis? Do we have to return to the state of living in harmony with nature? What it really means to live in harmony with nature? Does science really contribute to environmental problems? Is culture contrary to nature?

  • Values of Environmental Ethics

Values are one of the central categories of environmental ethics. How should we understand the environmental and ecological values? Who/what is the bearer of these values? What are these values in nature? Which values are the most important in environmental ethics?

v4-projekt-envi-obrazek

Deadlines and information:

Deadline for abstract submission –  15. September 2016.

Required abstract length is around 150 words or less.

Online application form can be found here:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeAd2V7Icn6aB117lhqd7NJvU6UYu2M2vyizYdA-A3mrS_-VQ/viewform

Information about accepting/rejecting the abstract within a week.

Accepted manuscripts will be published in the proceedings.

Full papers (no longer than 15 normpages) should be delivered until 1. October 2016 via email – enviroethicsv4@gmail.com

Conference fee 20e includes peer reviewed proceedings with ISBN on CD. Bank account number will be available on the web in the beginning of September 2016.

More information regarding the conference venue, conference program will be on the project web site:

https://www.facebook.com/Selected-approaches-to-environmental-ethics-in-V4-countries-271785813164357/

or find via FB @enviroethicsv4
Conference languages include: Slovak, Czech, Polish, English

CARE: Conference on Animal Rights in Europe

We are happy to invite you to the first international animal rights conference held in Warsaw, Poland.

29th – 31th July 2016

Our goal is to provide a platform for networking and skill-sharing and to make space for a debate about strategies, visions and paths for the animal rights movement.

We also want to foster solidarity with new organizations that are entering the animal rights movement. We want to empower activists from Eastern Europe and all other countries which do not have a long history of animal advocacy.

3 day program of the conference will feature over 50 lectures and workshops (⅔ of them in English, ⅓ in Polish), structured in blocks:
– Successful Campaigns
– The Psychology of Eating Meat
– Vegan Campaigning
– The Politics of Animal Rights
– Fundraising
– Psychological hygiene for activists
– Investigations
– Starting an organization
– Corporate Outreach
– Lobbying*
– Effective altruism and animals

We will publish list of speakers and detailed program soon. Please sign up to our newsletter to be the first one to receive updates.
=> http://www.careconf.eu/

Facebook event: CARE: Conference on Animal Rights in Europe

CARE-konference

Towards a Vegan Theory Conference, Oxford, England

‘With their skins on them, and … their souls in them’: Towards a Vegan Theory
An Interdisciplinary Humanities Conference
31st May 2016
University of Oxford

Building on the increasing prominence of the ‘animal turn’ in the humanities in the last decade, and the recent publication of Laura Wright’s The Vegan Studies Project: Food, Animals, and Gender in an Age of Terror (University of Georgia Press, 2015), this conference will seek to ask what kind of place veganism and/or ‘the vegan’ should occupy in our theorizations of human-animal relations, animal studies, and the humanities in general. An increasing number of individuals, particularly in the West, are now identifying as vegan, but the heterogeneity of reasons for doing so – animal suffering, the environment, health, anti-capitalism – suggests a broad, complex, and fertile place from which to rethink ways of being in the world.

As an identity-category based on choice and response, veganism asks difficult questions both of its own coherence, and of identitarian cultural politics and theory. It also, therefore, invites a rethinking of philosophical definitions of humans as the only animal which can respond, opening new ways of conceptualizing or challenging the human/animal binary. How might we articulate our responsibilities to other animals? Further, by challenging the foundations upon which notions of human identity have long been based it provides a framework for rethinking how we relate animal studies to broader postcolonial, feminist, queer and ecocritical theory. Thus, the conference looks to consider how engaging with veganism not just as a diet or lifestyle, but as a set of cognitive co-ordinates, might change current critical-theoretical practices. We therefore invite papers which explore – broadly or narrowly, practically or conceptually – what vegan ways of being in the world might do to our practices of reading. In other words, what might a vegan theory look, read, or sound like? And what is its place in the humanities?

Confirmed speakers include Dr Bob McKay (Sheffield), Prof Sara Salih (Toronto), Prof Jason Edwards (York) and a keynote from Prof Laura Wright (Western Carolina).

https://twitter.com/OxVeganTheory

This entry was posted on March 28, 2016, in Conference.

Major North American CAS Conference – June 2016

Alberta

Conference plenary panels will include: Decolonizing Critical Animal Studies, moderated by Billy-Ray Belcourt (University of Alberta) and featuring

• Kim TallBear (Associate Professor of Native Studies, University of Alberta),

• Maneesha Decka (Associate Professor of Law, University of Victoria), and

• Dinesh Wadiwel (Lecturer in Human Rights and Socio-legal Studies, University of Sydney).

Cripping Critical Animal Studies, moderated by Vittoria Lion (University of Toronto) and featuring

• Sunaura Taylor (artist and author),

• Stephanie Jenkins (Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Oregon State University), and

• A. Marie Houser (independent writer, editor, and activist).

Taxonomies of Power, Plenary by Claire Jean Kim (UC Irvine)

The first thread of conversation that we hope to develop is that of decolonizing Critical Animal Studies. While some theorists have turned to non-Western and indigenous cultures for examples of less or nonspeciesist worldviews, the relationship between anti-colonial politics and animal activism has been fraught. Single-issue animal activist campaigns have often functioned to justify racism, xenophobia and exclusion, with, to adapt Gayatri Spivak’s phrase, white humans saving animals from brown humans. The eating of shark fins and dog meat has been marked as cruel and backward, for instance, in contrast with dominant constructions of Western diets as sophisticated and humane. Indigenous rights activists and animal activists have clashed over the issue of hunting charismatic animals, such as whales and seals, often eclipsing attention to far more widespread forms of animal, colonial, and racial oppression in Western, settler societies. Ecofeminist approaches to animal ethics have been riven over the issue of indigenous hunting; some ecofeminists, such as Marti Kheel, have expressed dismissive views of the spiritual significance of subsistence hunting for indigenous people, while others, such as Val Plumwood, Deanne Curtin, and Karen Warren, have argued for contextual rather than universalizing forms of ethical vegetarianism. More recently, decolonial scholars have shown the interconnections between animal oppression, imperialism, and settler colonialism, and the need to center race in Critical Animal Studies. Maneesha Decka, for instance, has highlighted the ways that imperialism is justified through animalizations of racial others and condemnations of the ways colonized others treat animals, even while imperial identities are constituted through the consumption of animal bodies. Billy-Ray Belcourt has argued that speciesism and animal oppression are made possible in settler colonial contexts through the prior and ongoing dispossession and erasure of indigenous people from the lands on which animals are now domesticated and exploited. Belcourt critiques the ways that Critical Animal Studies assumes and operates within the ‘givenness’ of a settler colonial state, and suggests that Critical Animal Studies should center an analysis of indigeneity and call for the repatriation of indigenous lands. Possible presentation topics for the Decolonizing Critical Animal Studies thread include:

• The intersections of decolonial and Critical Animal Studies

• The uses of nonhuman animals in projects of land settlement

• Cultural food colonialism or decolonial food studies

• Reservization, food and fat studies

• Animal ethics and decolonization

• Animals, ontology, and settler colonialism

The second thread of conversation that we wish to pursue at this meeting is the cripping of Critical Animal Studies. Scholars working at the intersections of Critical Animal Studies and Critical Disability Studies have argued that the oppression of nonhuman animals and disabled humans are interconnected. Humans who defend animals and refrain from eating them have often found themselves labeled as cognitively disabled, mentally ill, ‘stupid’ or ‘crazy,’ and psychiatrists have proposed diagnoses for animal activists and vegans such as ‘anti-vivisection syndrome’ and ‘orthorexia nervosa.’ Disabled humans, like people of colour, have been put on display along with nonhuman animals in the history of ‘freak’ shows, and disabled humans and nonhuman animals continue to have their bodies objectified and their interests sacrificed for the purposes of medical training and scientific knowledge. Disabled humans are continually compared to nonhuman animals, not only in insults but also in medical terminology, with effects that are oppressive because of the pre-existing denigration of nonhuman animals. The same claims about what makes human life ontologically distinct and morally valuable—that humans have reason, that humans have language, that humans are autonomous—justify the exclusion of both nonhuman animals and cognitively disabled humans from moral consideration, as well as the oppression of physically disabled humans who are considered ‘dependent.’ Despite these interconnecting oppressions, speciesism has characterized Critical Disability Studies as much as ableism has characterized animal rights discourse (Peter Singer, Jeff McMahan). In recent years and more productively, however, Critical Animal Studies scholars such as Sue Donaldson, Will Kymlicka, Stephanie Jenkins and Sunaura Taylor have borrowed from Critical Disability Studies scholarship to argue that the dependency and vulnerability of domesticated animals should not be a reason to devalue their lives; far from removing a human or another animal from the realm of moral concern, (inter)dependency and vulnerability are the animal (and thus human) condition. Two types of animals come immediately to mind at the intersections of Critical Disability Studies and Critical Animal Studies: the service animal and the disabled animal, and scholars such as Kelly Oliver and A. Marie Houser have provided ethical analyses of these animals drawing on both animal and disability ethics. In particular, while disability scholars have critiqued the ways we view disabled humans as pitiful, tragic, exotic, or inspirational, Houser observes that heartwarming images of disabled pigs and dogs in mobility devices function to reassure viewers that we live in a society that is extraordinarily compassionate to animals, even while actual animals have by and large disappeared from view, sequestered in institutions of exploitation, containment and death. Possible presentation topics in the Cripping Critical Animal Studies thread include:

• Intersections of Critical Disability and Critical Animal Studies

• Critiques of the work of Temple Grandin

• The ethics of using service animals

• Representations of disabled animals

• The cultural associations between mental illness and love for animals (e.g. ‘crazy cat ladies’)

FORMAT: Presentations should be 20 minutes in length, leaving 10 minutes for discussion. We are receptive to different and innovative formats including but not limited to panels, performances, workshops, and public debates. You may propose individual or group presentations, but please specify the structure of your proposal. Please be sure to include your name(s), title(s), organizational affiliation(s), field of study or activism, and A/V needs in your submission.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: January 10, 2016

TO SUBMIT: email an abstract of no more than 500 words and a bio of no more than 150 words to the conference organizers: Chloë Taylor (chloe3[at]ualberta[dot]ca) and Kelly Struthers Montford (kelly.sm[at]ualberta[dot]ca)

Proposals open for next CAS European conference

After the success of the previous three European Conferences (Liverpool, Prague and Karlsruhe) and many of the same people meeting again at Minding Animals 2 (which took place in Utrecht, July 2012) as well as the postgrdaute conference in Exeter, UK (March 2012) we are now welcoming ideas and proposals for the next European Conference. We are looking for a new hosting country (this presently rules out the UK, the Czech Republic and the Germany). We anticipate a conference happening in late 2014 and we are also interested in receiving appropriate themes for the meeting.

The organisers of the previous conferences look forward to passing on their experience and expertise in order to help the new team.

Please send your ideas to icas.europe@gmail.com by March 31st 2014.

eu-conference.cas

Call for papers until 15th June!

Call for papers for the 3rd Annual European Conference for Critical Animal  Studies: Technoscientific developments and Critical Animal Studies – see details here: https://critical-animal-conf.org/call-for-papers/

The Conference will be in English and vegan.

Areas of inquiry include

  • Nonhuman animals and new technologies (such as biotechnology and neurosciences)
  • Intersection in exploitation of nonhuman animals and the environment (such as climate change, “vertical farming”)
  • Critical perspectives on domestication and breeding
  • Critique of animal experiments
  • Alternative technologies and alternative sciences
  • Interventions in and redefinitions of nature
  • Critical perspectives on ethology and the discourse on cognitive-abilities of nonhuman animals
  • Posthumanism and critical animal studies
  • “Bioart” and artistic use of technoscience to reflect on animal rights
  • Future of critical animal studies
  • Feminism (e.g. biotechnology and sexual violation)
  • Cultural and literary representations of nonhuman animals from a CAS perspective
  • Critical Animal Studies vs Human-Animal Studies and the problem of translation
  • other areas relevant to Critical Animal Studies

Formalities

  • Presentations should be fifteen to twenty minutes in length.
  • We are receptive to different and innovative formats including, but not limited to panels and workshops. You may propose individual or group “panel” presentations, but please clearly specify the structure of your proposal.
  • Please specify in your abstract whether it pertains to the academic or the activist field.
  • We encourage “young scholars” (graduate level – phd. level) to submit a talk. Please indicate, if you are a young scholar.
  • Please stress in your paper/roundtable/panel/etc. how you will be focusing on the program theme and linking it to critical animal studies. Also, please state if it does not address the conference theme.
  • Proposals or abstracts for panels, roundtables, workshops, or paper presentations should be no more than 500 words.
  • Please send with each facilitator or presenter a 100 maximum word biography (speaking to your activism and scholarship) in third person paragraph form.
  • Proposals will be evaluated anonymously. In order to facilitate the anonymization process, please include your name and affiliation on a separate page and make no reference to your identity in your proposal.
  • The deadline for submissions is June 15th 2013. Accepted presenters will be notified via e-mail by July 7th 2013.
  • Please submit your proposal to submissions@dimde.monoceres.uberspace.de (Please use this address for submissions only and ask your questions here, in case you have any.)

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This entry was posted on June 3, 2013, in Conference.