Call For Papers: ‘Animal Machines / Machine Animals’.

We would like to announce the details and call for papers for the British Animal Studies Network Autumn conference, entitled ‘Animal Machines / Machine Animals’.

The conference will take place on the 2nd and 3rd November, and is organised by the Life Geographies Group of the University of Exeter.

As well as a number of invited speakers (to be announced) we are also issuing this call for papers. If you are interested in giving a paper addressing the topic from whatever disciplinary perspective please submit an abstract of no more than 200 words with a brief biography (also of no more than 200 words). Please send them to R.Gorman@exeter.ac.uk and G.f.Davies@exeter.ac.uk.

The deadline for abstracts is Friday 29 June 2018. Presentations will be 20 minutes long, and we hope to include work by individuals at different career stages. Sadly we have no money to support travel, accommodation or attendance costs.

Meeting fees will be £25 for unwaged and £50 for waged attendees.

As with all previous BASN meetings, this one takes as its focus a key issue in animal studies that it is hoped will be of interest to scholars from a range of disciplines and to those working outside of academia. Topics covered at this meeting might include (but are not limited to):

  • The (re)shaping of human-animal relations through (ideas about) machines.
  • Animal-machine interactions, hybridities, and co-constitutions.
  • Ways of thinking across machines and animals in relation to ontology, epistemology, and ethics.
  • Animal bodies, agencies, and autonomies within mechanised systems.
  • The role of machines in facilitating and co-producing experiences and engagements with non-human animals.
  • Augmented and machinic animals in art, literature, and film.
  • The ontological and affective aspects of ‘robotic pets’ and other animal-machine hybrids.

We welcome papers that deal with the theme of ‘Machine Animals / Animal Machines’ in both contemporary and historical settings, and would especially like to see papers that address these issues from contexts outside the UK. Papers are welcomed from across animal studies, including disciplines such as (but not limited to) geography, anthropology, sociology, literary studies, art history, history, science and technology studies, ethology, psychology, behavioural sciences and ecology, bioscience/biomedical research.

For further details of the British Animal Studies Network go to http://www.britishanimalstudiesnetwork.org.uk

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The 6th EACAS conference in Barcelona

We are happy to announce that the 6th European Conference for Critical Animal Studies will take place at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, Spain.

It will be organized by the UPF-Centre for Animal Ethics and the research group CRITICC at the Department of Communication.

Organising committee conists of Núria Almiron, Eze Paez, Catia Faria, Daniela R. Warldhorn and Laura Fernández.

Expected date: 22nd – 24th May 2019
Call opening: 15th September 2018
Call deadline: 15th December 2018
Notifications of acceptance/rejections: 15th January 2019
Online registration opening the 15th January 2019

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Review of the Fifth European Conference for Critical Animal Studies

CfHAS PhD candidate Abi Masefield (UK) offers a review of the recent Fifth European Conference for Critical Animal Studies, held at the Pufendorf Institute, Lund University, Sweden 26-28th October 2017

NONHUMAN ANIMALS IN SOCIETY:
EXPLORING NEW PATHWAYS FOR RESISTANCE, CHANGE, AND ACCOMMODATION

The European Association for Critical Animal Studies (EACAS) www.eacas.eu

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Photo: Terry Hurtado

This was my first Critical Animal Studies (CAS) Conference and set against the backdrop of bright Autumnal Lund I was certainly not disappointed. The stated aim of this conference was to ‘display how scholarly work can contribute to eliminate the domination and oppression of all animals’. It was very much an international event with over 125 people attending from over 19 countries spanning 5 continents, and the event was impressively managed by the 6 strong organizing committee (The full programme can be found at: https://animalsconferencelund.wordpress.com/).

Spread over three full days, the skeleton of the conference was structured around a quartet of key note presentations by Zipporah Weisberg; Jo-Anne McArthur; Erika Cudworth and Matthew Cole; and Volker Sommer. In between these deep-dives, the classical conference structure of parallel panel presentations prevailed to flesh out the content and provide an abundance of opportunities for researchers to both share their work and digest the rich offerings of others. Personally, I had not anticipated just how important the feedback I received following a presentation of my own research (at Edge Hill University – exploring the intersections of coloniality and speciesism in development discourse around tackling hunger and malnutrition and ‘the right to food’ with ‘the right to not be food’) would be in terms of helping me to prioritise the relative significance of certain messages as well as to fire up my motivation.

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Photo: Tereza Vandrovcová

Coffee breaks (known as ‘fika’ in Swedish and sometimes accompanied by a delicious sweet treat to energise participants) often felt too short to continue conversations and a delicious dinner at Kao’s vegan restaurant in Malmo provided a much needed breathing space for further discussion.
Of course, a conference is experienced from specific vantage points. Looking back, this one was nothing less than a richly orchestrated three-day firework display of explosive ideas, sparking questions and colourful interactions. As a researcher embarking on the daunting adventure of a PhD the overall effect was both dazzling and inspiring.

The key note presentations were each fascinating in their own way. However, one in particular stood out by resonating with my own research and introducing me to a key thinker who I had somehow failed to register so far in the wanderings of my literature review. So I am especially grateful to Lund for acquainting me with Erika Cudworth and her insights into the ‘theoretical and political challenges to exclusive humanism’ and the animalization inherent not only in colonialism, but in the entire ‘civilizing process’ in which we are all caught up and thereby alienated from our animal selves. Erika’s paper setting out a ‘posthumanist manifesto’ and call for a ‘strategy of terraism’ starts from both the ‘bodied nature of the human’ and the ‘shrinking of the idea of the human as we know it.’ Needless to say, I have been hungrily exploring her writing in the weeks since the conference.

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Photo: Tereza Vandrovcová

So many other ideas have continued to resonate through my thinking long since the conference ended. Zipporah Weisberg’s discussion of animals’ capacity to care as an additional confirmation of their agency has opened my awareness (as a Terran) in reconnecting with animals. Jo-Anne McArthur’s powerful images have reinforced my appreciation of the requirement to resist the urge to turn away. David Pederson’s ‘Meat-a-Physics’ has made me more determined than ever to better understand meat as a core identifier of humanism. Iselin Gambert and Tobias Linne’s exploration of the entanglement of milk with colonial power and white supremacy drew important connections. And whenever I hear ‘the news’ before long I am reminded of Terry Hurtado’s examination of the connection between dehumanisation and animal suffering in times of war and the characterisation of war as the animalisation of humans (the exclusion of the human enemy from the moral community).

The conference also pushed participants to think more about the potential value of Marxist perspectives for critical animal studies (particularly Adorno with reference to the human’s forgotten ‘likeness to animals’) and invited participants into urban spaces as well as among camel and chimpanzee communities.

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Photo: Tereza Vandrovcová

With the conference drawing to a close, inevitably, and just like every delicious feast, satiation began to set in and I started to realise that my mind was getting tired. But as my youngest daughter always reminds me, no matter how full we may feel, there is always a room for a desert. So, it was with EvaMarie Lindahl’s innovative and deeply moving performance piece, set in the Bishops House gallery and evolving from her practice based doctoral project in which she rewrites art from the perspective of the non-human animals who are standing inside the frame. EvaMarie is a Malmo based artist and doctoral student with the Centre for Human Animal Studies at Edge Hill University. This unexpected experience, transporting those present to an entirely different realm, made the perfect closure for a weary brain, as it spoke to somewhere entirely different – perhaps more embedded in my animal self.

As thoughts turn to the next CAS Conference – Barcelona in 2019 – EvaMarie’s performance also lights up the tremendous creative possibilities presented by the opportunity to go bolder, re-imagine and further de-civilize the very institution of the Conference (carnference?) – one that remains so firmly rooted in the ‘civilizing’ project. To harness the performance itself to contribute to destabilising the classical divides of human and animal, mind and body, theory and practice, academic and activist that gave rise to the birth of Critical Animal Studies in the first place.

But before time moves on, what remains to be said is one final and truly heartfelt THANK YOU to Lund for making possible an unforgettable exchange with such wonderful people. This conference was a special moment – the sort that occur only occasionally in life, but will be treasured for long after.

Abi Masefield (PhD Candidate, Centre for Human-Animal Studies, Edge Hill University, UK)
January 2018

CFP: (Un)common worlds: Contesting the limits of human–animal communities

Human–Animal Studies Conference — 7–9 August 2018 Turku, Finland

 

The Finnish Society for Human-Animal Studies (YKES) is proud to organize the first international Human-Animal Studies conference held in Finland.

Keynote speakers are Erica Fudge (University of Strathclyde), Jamie Lorimer (University of Oxford) and Helena Telkänranta (University of Bristol and University of Helsinki)

The deadline for abstracts: February 28, 2018.

Conference website: https://uncommonworlds.wordpress.com/

 

Conference call:

Humans and other animals share spaces and create communities together. They touch each other in various symbolic and material ways, constantly crossing and redrawing communal, ethical and very practical boundaries. As of late, this multifarious renegotiation of human-animal relations has sparked intense debates both in the public arena and in academia.

For instance, Bruno Latour argues that the anthropocene (marking the massive human impact on ecosystems) creates a new territory in which traditional subject/object separations are no longer useful. What is called for is the transgressing or dissolving of these limits in order to “distribute agency as far and in as differentiated a way as possible” (Latour 2014, 16). Various inclusive, more-than-human notions, such as ‘cosmopolitics’ (Stengers 2010) or ’common worlds’ (Latour 2004) are brought forward to this end. These discussions highlight what is becoming a core challenge for various disciplines and fields of study: how to live together in complex places, spaces and societies, with intersecting and overlapping borders and traces of cultures, histories and politics. Furthermore, the discussions bring forth the question of how to work against the premises of exclusive human agency and interest in order to explore and imagine multispecies futures.

However, the various conceptualisations of inclusive, common worlds entail a risk of disregarding or devaluing that which is not shared: the aspects of multispecies lives that cannot be or become common but that nevertheless matter for shared existences. There is also the issue of becoming “common” – of territorialisations and inclusions of some beings to the exclusion of others. What will remain the “uncommon” (i.e. unconventional) in common worlds? Moreover, are common worlds envisaged as free of political struggles and borders? What are the politics of becoming common and remaining uncommon?

With this Call we invite you to discuss and develop ideas about human-animal worlds both common and uncommon. We invite presentations to this interdisciplinary conference from various fields, including but not limited to social sciences, law, arts and humanities, and natural and environmental sciences. We also invite artists to present their work. If you are interested in this option, please contact the organizers to discuss your ideas.

 

Submission guidelines

Please send your abstract (max. 250 words) by e-mail to uncommonworlds2018@gmail.com no later than February 28, 2018. Please include in your submission the title of your presentation, your name, affiliation, and contact information. We will notify you of acceptance on March 2017.

 

Conference costs and registration

Registration for the conference opens in March 2018.

Early bird registration fees (until 31 May 2018) are 110 Euros for members of the society, 130 Euros for non-members, and 90 Euros for students.

Late bird registration fees (until 31 July 2018) are 130 Euros for members of the society, 150 Euros for non-members, and 110 Euros for students.

The conference fee includes refreshments during the conference. Conference dinner is subject to an additional fee.

 

About the Finnish Society for Human–Animal Studies

The Finnish Society for Human–Animal Studies is a scientific association that brings together researchers in the multidisciplinary field of human–animal studies in Finland. Founded in 2009, the society has since organized six annual national human–animal studies conferences. The society is a member of the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies. For more information, please visit: https://elaintutkimus.wordpress.com/finnish-society-for-human-animal-studies/.

 

Please feel free to circulate this to anyone who might be interested!

Call for papers: 5th European Conference for Critical Animal Studies (Lund, Sweden)

NONHUMAN ANIMALS IN SOCIETY: EXPLORING NEW PATHWAYS FOR RESISTANCE, CHANGE AND ACCOMODATION, 5th European Conference for Critical Animal Studies

International conference at Lund University, the Pufendorf Institute

Hosted by the European Association for Critical Animal Studies

The 26th to 28th of October 2017

Keynote Speakers:

  • Zipporah Weisberg, independent scholar
  • Volker Sommer, professor of Evolutionary Anthropology.

Conference Website: https://animalsconferencelund.wordpress.com

CALL FOR PAPERS

Historically, nonhuman animals have been placed outside the realm of society and the social. Often relegated to being part of ‘nature,’ nonhuman animals are often represented as the passive and subordinate counterpart of ‘culture’. These social constructions and representation of other animals have contributed to the sustainment of human supremacy and dominance, which until this day permeate the conditions of nonhuman animals in society. Over the past decades, a growing body of literature, cultural texts and scholarly work has dealt critically with the devaluation and misrepresentation of other animals. Influenced by “the animal turn” in the humanities and social sciences, this scholarship has examined both the presence and absence, the visibility and invisibility of nonhuman animals in society. By means of highlighting the social nature of these representations, work has been done to render nonhuman animal resistance, and change more visible. Additionally, with recent developments within scientific disciplines such as ethology, a new focus of research, one that highlights the individuality and agency of nonhuman animals has emerged. This contributes to an altered view on nonhuman animals, whether they are living within or in the periphery of human societies.

The aim of this conference is to bring to focus how scholarly work can contribute to the disruption and replacement of violent and exploitative practices, while also providing a platform for exploring the variety of ways that more just inter-species relations might be established. Special attention will be given to how scholarships and transdisciplinary work can engage with these problems as they exist in media, politics, popular culture and other aspects of everyday life.

On October 26th to 28th 2017, the 5th European Conference for Critical Animal Studies will be hosted by the European Association for Critical Animal Studies (EACAS).

The conference invites scholars and activists from all disciplines dealing with the three broad and intersecting themes, society, media and culture, and how they are assessed in Critical Animal Studies.

The conference welcomes proposals from a variety of scholars and disciplines, including radical academics, independent researchers, students and community activists. Papers may focus on any aspect of the three stands, including but not limited to the following themes:

  • Nonhuman animals and media
  • Nonhuman animals and culture
  • Culture – nature-dualism and its criticism
  • Nonhuman animals and social theory
  • Nonhuman animals and critical theory
  • Social Justice and nonhuman animals
  • Ethology and societal perception of animals
  • Normative aspects of animals in media and culture
  • The political principles of animal liberation
  • The construction of just interspecies institutions.
  • The politics and political theory of interspecies co-existence at farm sanctuaries
  • Histories and genealogies of multispecies politics and communities
  • Nonhuman animals and agency
  • Nonhuman animals and social classes
  • Nonhuman animals and colonialism
  • Animal liberation and anarchism
  • Animal liberation as a social movement
  • Nonhuman animals and feminism
  • Nonhuman animals and ableism
  • Nonhuman animals and critical race studies

The conference encourages the emancipatory approach of scholar activists in the field of critical animal studies.

Please note that there will be a 40€ registration fee for the conference. Registration for students, unemployed people or individuals with a low income will be 20€.

Prospective speakers are invited to submit abstracts of 500 words, and a brief biography including name, affiliation and contact details.

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 28th April 2017

Decisions on abstracts: 22nd May 2017

For more information about the conference, or to submit an abstract, please email the organising committee: animalsconferencelund@gmail.com

https://animalsconferencelund.wordpress.com

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CFP: 2nd International Symposium on Veganism and Law 22nd and 23rd of July 2017 Berlin, Germany

Call for Papers

**DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS: April 7th, 2017**

Veganism is rapidly growing in popularity but how are vegans supported by our laws and equality measures or the regulations and polices that they influence? Whilst the UK Equality and Human Rights Commission states that veganism comes within the scope of protection of human rights and equality measures, veganism in other countries is regarded to be largely exempt from such protection.

In the recent past, vegan lawyers have successfully litigated in cases concerning discrimination against vegans and some countries, such as Italy and Portugal, have made attempts to obtain legal protection for the dietary aspect of veganism.

In 2016, an All Party Parliamentary Group was established in the UK to give a voice to the demands of vegans; Jeanette Rowley published a chapter in Critical Perspectives on Veganism arguing that veganism is transformational for the exclusivity of human rights; Italian Carlo Prisco published The Right to Vegetarianism and Ralf Müller-Amenitsch published Vegan im Recht in Germany.

This growing area of interest is critical to the development and well-being of the global vegan community and has enormous potential for animal rights. In 2017 and onwards, we expect to see more vital and informative work in this area.

Building on our first international Symposium on The Right to a Plant Based Diet, and our concluding Declaration that veganism comes within the scope of various human rights principles and provisions, this Symposium asks further questions about veganism in law. Its aims are to examine the strengths and limits of international and regional laws for veganism and vegans, to highlight the value that legal protection for veganism can bring to nonhumans and to explore how vegan rights can contribute towards the end of speciesist prejudice. For more detailed information on the call please see http://www.theivra.com/symposium-2017.html

CFP: Workshop: Empathy, Animals, Film

Call for participation and papers for phd candidates and postdocs

Workshop: Empathy, Animals, Film

With Prof. Lori Gruen (Wesleyan University)

International workshop at the University of Basel, June 20, 2017

Guest: Lori Gruen (Convenors: Markus Wild, Friederike Zenker, Livia Boscardin)

Registration Deadline: April 30, 2017

20/21–24 June 2017, the annual conference of the SLSAeu will be held in Basel on the topic of “Empathies” (http://www.empathies2017.com).

In this context, the workshop provides a forum to explore concepts of empathy with regard to animals and especially animals on film.

Empathy is a key concept in contemporary studies focussing on animals e.g. in Animal Ethics or research on Animal Minds. Humans and other animals engage with each other by means of empathy. The understanding thereby ranges from a cognitive ability to put oneself into the shoes of the other to more basic forms of immediate affective resonance. In our workshop, we are particularly keen to discuss Lori Gruen’s idea of ‘Entangled Empathy’. The aim is to bring together the thinking about entangled empathy and cinematic images of animals. In which ways do films contribute to empathetic engagement, respectively might refuse to do so? In a critique of traditional ethic theory, Gruen emphasizes how important the idea of particular animals, cases and contexts is for an alternative model of ethics. Accordingly, we would like to explore the transformative power of particular animals that become visible on film, as well as possible limits of the filmic medium.

We would like to address questions such as: 1) What is specific about empathy towards animals? How do animals engage empathically with humans? 2) What, if any, are the moral values of empathy? What is the moral value of specific concepts of empathy, e.g. entangled empathy? 3) How can we relate concepts of empathy to experiences with animals on film? How does the medium of film – particular films, scenes, cinematic narratives etc. – contribute to the empathic engagement of viewers?

PhD candidates and early postdocs from fields including, but not limited to, philosophy, anthropology, human-animal-studies, cultural studies, film studies and media studies are encouraged to participate. To apply for participation, please submit both a short CV and a short letter of motivation.

Participants who wish to discuss their own work are encouraged to submit a short abstract of their presentation (1 page). Be prepared to give a 15-min presentation. We invite submissions concerning the work of Lori Gruen (e.g. discussions of the concept of entangled empathy and related topics) and/or the topic of animals in visual media. The conference language is English.

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Please hand in all documents electronically to Friederike Zenker: The deadline for submissions is April 30, 2017.  Notice of acceptance or rejection will be announced on May 12, 2017. For questions or further information please contact Friederike Zenker

Contact

Friederike Zenker friederike.zenker@unibas.ch

University of Basel / eikones NFS Bildkritik / Rheinsprung 11 / CH – 4051 Basel

Call for contributions: Animal Liberation and Pedagogy

Deadlines: 28. February 2017 Outline + Bio | 30. April 2017 Contribution

Vegan educators are invited to contribute to this volume of essays on animal liberation and pedagogy. For the purposes of this book, the term ‘educator’ is very loosely defined and does not only refer to professionals in teaching positions. This project invites anybody who sees themselves as a facilitator of knowledge, be they teachers, authors, artists, activists or anybody else who is in a position to offer a platform for knowledge exchange in a private or public setting (including parents and guardians, key workers, public speakers, etc.).

The book hopes to serve as a platform for the exchange of practical tools, including revolutionary communication skills and radical approaches to pedagogy, all of which should incorporate a thematisation of animal liberation, speciesism or animalisation/dehumanisation amongst humans. Through this, it shall serve as a critique of and counterbalance to neoliberal education and its adherence to a mostly binaristic, white, heteronormative, masculinist, Euro- and anthropocentric curriculum.

Preference will be given to essays that critique the predominantly Eurocentric neoliberal, white, masculinist approach to (teaching) animal liberation, and/or to essays that present or imagine alternatives to dominant approaches in animal liberation in an educational context.

Contributions could address, but are not restricted to, the following areas:

– teachers as activists and activists as teachers

– pedagogical approaches to communicating animal suffering

– the ethics of teaching animal liberation (e.g. to children or when using imagery of animal suffering)

– animal oppression as part of a larger system of injustice (e.g. discussions of kyriarchy, or intersectionality if not appropriated by white contributors)

– teaching animal liberation (antispeciesism, veganism) as resistance to imperialism, racism, misogyny, genderism, heteronormativity, ableism, classism etc.

– animal liberation in an indigenous and anticolonialist / decolonialisation context

– teaching animal liberation in an interdisciplinary context (e.g. through a combination of science and art)

– making animal liberation relevant in specific subjects (e.g. Food Technology; Critical Food Studies; Media Studies; International Relations; Gender Studies; Disability Studies etc.)

– introducing veganism into non-animal-centered movements (e.g. doing vegan outreach in some form or another within feminism, queer communities, Antifa, BLM, occupy, environmentalism etc.)

– being a vegan pedagogue in a context that is hostile towards vegans

– teaching animal liberation under government repression (i.e. anti-terror laws, military regime etc.)

– teaching animal liberation from a marginalised position

Please outline your proposed work in 500 words and add a few lines about yourself to the proposal email. Contributions will be chosen in January and the final pieces could have a word count between 2500 and 7000 (please include a roughly estimated word count in your outline).

The English used in the essays should be as accessible as possible. Personal accounts, letters, diary entries, are welcome as are critical and academic analyses, however when theory and/or jargon is used it should be explained in the text itself or a glossary. If footnotes are used, please include them on the page they refer to.

Email Dr Agnes Trzak | a.trzak@gmail.com

CFP Animal Liberation in Pedagogy Extended

CfHAS conference Cfp: Animals and Social Change | 29 – 30th June 2017 | Liverpool, UK.

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CfHAS conference Cfp: Animals and Social Change | 29 – 30th June 2017 | Liverpool, UK.

CfHAS will host a conference on the theme of animals and social change in June 2017. We invite submissions that address these questions:

  • What constitutes effective social change for other animals?
  • How do particular framings of animal ethics and veganism shape strategies for intervention and change?
  • How do the worlds of animal advocacy and academic research on human-animal relations speak to each other? Could more come from those interactions?
  • What role do visual media, the online vegan community and documentary film-making play in effecting social change?
  • How do different communities imagine progressive social change for animals taking place?

We are interested in receiving submissions of academic papers (20 minutes), short films (any genre) and poster presentations. This conference will include paper and poster presentations, film screenings and a workshop session focused on strategies for social change involving dialogue between academics, activists and advocates. The conference is designed to facilitate time and space for discussion.

This conference will be of interest to those working in critical animal studies, advocacy, grassroots activism, animal media and the vegan business community.

Please submit abstracts to: cfhas@edgehill.ac.uk

Closing date for abstracts: 1st March 2017

The Centre for Human-Animal Studies (CfHAS) was formed in October 2014 during its inaugural conference held in Liverpool and the Edge Hill campus. CfHAS is an interdisciplinary forum for research and activities that engage with the complex material, ethical and symbolic relationships between humans and other animals.  The Centre acts as a hub for research. It has established links and collaborations with colleagues in Australia, New Zealand and Canada, and with the broader academic and advocacy community in the UK.

CFP: Writing Meat: Flesh-Eating and Literature Since 1900

The conversion of animal bodies into flesh for human consumption is a practice where relations of power between humans and nonhuman animals are reproduced in exemplary form. From the decline of (so-called) traditional animal husbandry to the emergence of intensive agriculture and, more recently, the biotechnological innovation of in vitro meat, the last hundred years have seen dramatic changes in processes of meat production, as well as equally significant shifts in associated patterns of human-animal relations. Over the same period, meat consumption has risen substantially and incited the emergence of new forms of political subjectivity, from nationalist agitation against ritual slaughter to the more radical rejection of meat production in abolitionist veganism.

Distinct disciplinary responses to meat production and consumption have occurred across the humanities and social sciences in areas including (but not limited to) food studies, gender studies, postcolonial studies, ecocriticism, and (critical) animal studies. Theoretical engagements with these upheavals have ranged from viewing meat production as a site of affective encounter and irresolvably complex ethical entanglements, to framing industrialised slaughter as a privileged practice in what Dinesh Wadiwel has recently diagnosed as a biopolitical ‘war against animals’. This edited collection solicits essays which engage with these transformations in the meanings and material practices of meat production and consumption in literature and theory since 1900. We seek contributions from scholars working on representations of meat in any area of literary studies (broadly conceived) but are particularly interested in essays that challenge dominant narratives of meat-eating and conceptions of animals as resources.

Suggested topics include, but are by no means limited to the following:

  • Meat and nationalism/racism
  • Meat and colonialism/postcolonialism
  • The globalisation of meat
  • Future meat (in vitro etc.)
  • Meat and ‘the natural’
  • Meat eating and hospitality/sociality/ritual
  • Vegan theory
  • Meat and nostalgia
  • Unconventional meats: bushmeat, insects etc.
  • Cannibalism (human and non-human)
  • Predation/nonhuman meat-eating
  • Food and abjection
  • The edible and the inedible
  • Sacrifice
  • Meat eating and extinction
  • Flesh/protein/masculinities
  • Revisiting the sexual politics of meat
  • Meat and ‘disordered’ eating
  • Meat production and climate change
  • Dietary orientations towards meat: veganism, pescatarianism, paleo diets
  • Meat substitutes/simulated meats
  • Carnophallogocentrism
  • Hunting/fishing
  • Animal escapees
  • Spaces of meat production (slaughterhouses, farms etc.)
  • Meat and zoonosis

The volume will be submitted to Palgrave Studies in Animals and Literature:

http://www.palgrave.com/gp/series/14649

Please send abstracts of 300 words along with a brief biographical statement to Seán McCorry (s.mccorry@sheffield.ac.uk) and John Miller (john.miller@sheffield.ac.uk) by Monday, January 23 rd 2017. Essays of approximately 7000 words in length will be commissioned for delivery in September 2017.

Other books from the same series:

animals-in-irish-literature  kafka 9781137520661

This entry was posted on October 31, 2016, in Calls, Journal.