CFP: Animal Futures: Animal rights in activism and academia

Call for presentation proposals

Critical animal studies scholars and animal advocacy activists have long argued that human-animal relations are in a profound state of crisis. Humans continue to exploit other animals on a massive scale. This has devastating consequences for nonhuman animals themselves, as well as for human societies and ecosystems. This has become painfully evident with the current pandemic, which is taking a massive toll on individual lives and societies. Many viruses, such as the coronavirus originate from nonhuman animals and are transmitted to humans largely due to the fact that humans continue to use other animals for food, entertainment and other purposes stemming from human interests. Such pandemics are expected to continue, as human exploitation of non-human animals continues. In this predicament, there is an urgent need to develop a more viable and non-exploitative relationship to other species and ecosystems. This conference focuses on imagining futures for human-animal relations, in a world that is rapidly transforming. We invite papers to engage for example, with the following issues, from critical animal studies perspectives:

  • What challenges and opportunities do global crises present for theorising and working towards animal liberation?

  • What should and could be some new directions in animal advocacy activism?

  • How can feminist, queer, disability, postcolonial and other perspectives inform our understanding of other animals and our relations to them?

  • Etc.

We are looking forward to contributions from academics and activists.

Please send your abstract (max 300 words) to conference@loomus.ee by September, 30, 2020. 

The conference will also be live streamed. It is possible to deliver a presentation via Skype.  

All the practical information (including speakers, registration, food, accommodation, fees) will be published later in 2020. 

Organized by Loomus, Estonian Vegan Society and Kuulitalu OÜ

Venue: Pärimusmuusika Ait, Viljandi, Estonia

Date: May 8th 2021 – May 9th 2021

https://www.facebook.com/events/916549622101201

Predatory Journals Warning

Dear all,


We hope all of you are doing well in this particular time we are going through. We are writing to you because some participants at the EACAS Conference in Barcelona (2019) recently informed us about invitations they have received to publish theirconference papers in journals with dubious credibility.


Out of concern for these practices, we wanted to warn you about the reality of predatory journals, of which some of you may be very familiar with, but some may not.  Predatory journals are publications which incurre in deceptive practices, mostly involving charging publication fees to authors without checking articles for quality and legitimacy and without providing the other editorial and publishing services that legitimate academic journals provide, whether open access or not. 
For further information we recommend you check these lists of Predatory Journals and Publishers. Also, Think. Check. Submit helps through the process of choosing a journal to submit your work.


Best wishes,


UPF-Centre for Animal Ethics
Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Departament de comunicació
Roc Boronat, 138
Barcelona 08018 (Spain)
Tel: +34 93 542 1237
https://www.upf.edu/cae
cae@upf.edu

Photo by Gerald Schömbs on Unsplash

New book announcement: Making Sense of ‘Food’ Animals by Paula Arcari

Title: Making Sense of ‘Food’ Animals A Critical Exploration of the Persistence of ‘Meat’ (2020)

Author: Paula Arcari

This book addresses the persistence of meat consumption and the use of animals as food in spite of significant challenges to their environmental and ethical legitimacy. Drawing on Foucault’s regime of power/knowledge/pleasure, and theorizations of the gaze, it identifies what contributes to the persistent edibility of ‘food’ animals even, and particularly, as this edibility is increasingly critiqued. Beginning with the question of how animals, and their bodies, are variously mapped by humans according to their use value, it gradually unpacks the roots of our domination of ‘food’ animals – a domination distinguished by the literal embodiment of the ‘other’. The logics of this embodied domination are approached in three inter-related parts that explore, respectively, how knowledge, sensory and emotional associations, and visibility work together to render animal’s bodies as edible flesh. The book concludes by exploring how to more effectively challenge the ‘entitled gaze’ that maintains ‘food’ animals as persistently edible.

For more info and free preview please visit: https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9789811395840

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Call for Book Chapters: Denialism in Environmental and Animal Abuse

CALL FOR BOOK CHAPTERS for the volume

Denialism in Environmental and Animal Abuse: Averting Our Gaze

in the Lexington Books series: Environment and Society

(series ed. Douglas Vakoch)

 

Editors:

Dr. Tomaž Grušovnik (Faculty of Education, University of Primorska, Slovenia)

Dr. Karen Lykke Syse (Centre for Development and the Environment, University of Oslo, Norway)

Dr. Reingard Spannring (Institute for Educational Studies, University of Innsbruck, Austria),

 

Short outline:

Despite readily available facts and figures regarding human-caused natural degradation and often overwhelming scientific consensus on issues related to environmental pollution, we are still faced with the disbelief about the existence and extent of anthropogenic impact on the environment. The failure of the so-called Information Deficit Model, according to which public inaction and apathy are generally attributable to lack of relevant information, prompted natural and socials sciences as well as humanities to look for alternative accounts of passivity and inertia in the field of environmental education and awareness-raising. Thus, in the last two decades researchers increasingly focused on the concept of “denialism” as the more suitable explanation of the lack of significant environmental change. Several fields contributed to our understanding of the phenomenon, including anthropology, social psychology, philosophy, sociology, linguistics, ecocriticism, natural science and science communication. The proposed edited volume thus seeks to provide a clear and comprehensive contribution to our understanding of the “environmental denial” with chapters from researchers in natural and social sciences as well as humanities, disclosing the multifaceted appearance of the concept by approaching it from different perspectives.

In somewhat similar fashion to environmental disciplines, animal ethics, critical animal studies, and related fields also stumbled on an analogous phenomenon when trying to account for our increasing meat consumption and lack of empathy for the animals slaughtered in the industries despite the efforts of educators, activists, and academia to raise the awareness of the harsh realities of “Animal-Industrial Complex.” Indeed, several papers in recent decades have focused on consumers’ cognitive dissonance as the vehicle for ignorance, as well as on the drastic consequences of the denial, including Perpetration-Induced-Traumatic-Stress that occurs in workplaces demanding repeated exposure to violence. As the research shows, more than hundred and fifty billions of animals killed annually by the industries are hardly a consequence of our ignorance and lack of empathy; to the contrary, withdrawal of compassion for the suffering animals can be seen as a product of socialization into carnistic societies. The edited volume thus also aims to present the reader with recent insights into the denial of animal sentience, subjectivity, and agency in range of contexts, providing opportunity of both denialism debates – environmental as well as animal – to mutually shed light onto each other.

 

Book chapters explicitly addressing at least one of the following issues are welcomed:

– psychological, anthropological, sociological and/or philosophical aspects of environmental denialism;

– cognitive dissonance and denialism in carnistic societies;

– consequences of denialism in Animal-Industrial Complex;

– environmental education and environmental denial;

– animal rights education and denial of animal subjectivity and agency;

– denialism and possible alternative explanations of refusal to acknowledge environmental and animal abuse;

– similar topics that explicitly address denialism in the context of environmental and animal abuse;

 

Submission procedure:

Chapter proposal submissions are invited from researchers and academics on or before September 30, 2019. Proposals should not exceed 1000 words, presenting main arguments of the chapter and explaining how they fit into the general theme of the volume.

Proposals in Word or PDF formats (Times New Roman, 12, 1.5 spacing) should be sent to

tomaz.grusovnik@pef.upr.si and reingard.spannring@uibk.ac.at

on or before the specified date together with author’s CVs. Authors will be notified about the potential acceptance of their chapters by October 31, 2019. Full chapter submissions will be due by January 31, 2020. Full chapters should be around 6000 words in length, following Lexington “Production Guidelines” (https://rowman.com/Page/PROGUIDE). All chapters will be subject to peer-reviews. Once the chapters have been reviewed, final chapters will have to be submitted within 2 months from the date they are returned to authors. The volume is planned to be published in late 2020 or early 2021. For more information about the project please write to Tomaž Grušovnik and Reingard Spannring to the above addresses.

 

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Proposals open for the next EACAS conference

After the success of the 6th EACAS Conference last month in Barcelona we are now looking for proposals for the next conference three day conference to be held in 2021. We are ideally looking for a new hosting country (conferences have already taken place in the UK, the Czech Republic, Germany, Portugal, Sweden and Spain). We anticipate a conference happening in May or September 2021 and we are also interested in receiving appropriate themes for the meeting.

The organisers of the Barcelona conference look forward to passing on their experience and expertise in order to help the new team.

Please send your ideas to eacas.eu@gmail.com by September 15th 2019.

eacas-barcelona

New book announcement: Schizoanalysis and Animal Science Education by Helena Pedersen

About Schizoanalysis and Animal Science Education

Within the education system, acts of violence toward animals take place and are manifested on a routine basis in science classes, in lecture halls, in school canteens, and during study visits to zoos, farms, and slaughterhouses. Taken for granted as ”necessary” for teaching and learning, this violence profoundly affects animals as well as students. It also provides new entry points for understanding education as a multispecies power regime, driven by numerous other investments than knowledge dissemination alone. What, then, is the nature of this educational violence, and how exactly does education work through techniques of interference with student and animal bodies?

Based on ethnographic research within upper secondary schools and higher education, this book challenges the use of animals in education by innovative engagement of Deleuze and Guattari’s tool of schizoanalysis. Sparking a fundamental rethinking of educational processes, relations, and aims, the book explores how scientific knowledge about animals proliferates through complex interplay of power and desire in contested spaces of teaching and learning. Configuring animal science education as a set of machines working in tandem with the animal industry, Helena Pedersen offers radical new insights into how education forms subjectivities and social orders under conditions of capitalist expansion that capture students and animals alike. Bringing together education studies, science studies, critical animal studies, and continental philosophy, Pedersen also provides examples of disruptive action that can put education to work for transformation and liberation.

For further information, including a table of contents and ordering information, please see https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/schizoanalysis-and-animal-science-education-9781350061842/

schizoanalysis-and-animal-science

This entry was posted on February 4, 2019, in books.

CFP: Beastly Modernisms

September 12-13, 2019
University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland
Abstracts due 31 January 2019

Keynote Speakers:
Kari Weil, Wesleyan University (US)
Derek Ryan, University of Kent (UK)

I still do not think La Somnambule the perfect title – Night Beast would be better except for that debased meaning now put on that nice word beast.’ – Djuna Barnes to Emily Holmes Coleman

‘Once again we are in a knot of species coshaping one another in layers of reciprocating complexity all the way down’ – Donna Haraway

If modernism heralded a moment of socio-political, cultural and aesthetic transformation, it also instigated a refashioning of how we think about, encounter, and live with animals. Beasts abound in modernism. Virginia Woolf’s spaniel, T.S. Eliot’s cats, James Joyce’s earwig, D.H. Lawrence’s snake, Samuel Beckett’s lobster, and Djuna Barnes’s lioness all present prominent examples of where animals and animality are at the forefront of modernist innovation. At stake in such beastly figurations are not just matters of species relations, but questions of human animality and broader ideas of social relations, culture, sex, gender, capitalism, and religion. Modernism’s interest in the figure of the animal speaks to the immense changes in animal life in the early twentieth century, a period where the reverberations of Darwinian theory were being felt in the new life sciences, as well as emergent social theories that employed discourses of species, and developing technologies and markets that radically alerted everyday human-animal relations. It was also a period in which new theories of human responsibilities towards animals were also being articulated with Donald Watson coining the idea of veganism in 1944.

The recent “animal turn” in the humanities invites new ways of thinking about the beasts that we find in modernist culture. Moreover, animal studies arrives at a point at which modernist studies is already in the process of redefining what modernism means. Turning to modernism’s beasts not only promises fresh ways of understanding its multispecies foundations, but also points towards how modernist studies might intervene in contemporary debates around animal life. Building on the foundational work on animals and modernism by Carrie Rohman, Margot Norris, Kari Weil, Derek Ryan and others, Beastly Modernisms invites papers on animals and all aspects of modernist culture. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

•    Animal Life, Species and Speciesism
•    Beasts, Beastliness and Bestiality
•    The Creaturely
•    Unstable Signifiers
•    Animal Rights, Ethics and Politics
•    Anti-Vivisection Movements
•    Bestial Ontologies and Materialities
•    Queer Animals and Sexuality
•    Anthropocentrism and Anthropomorphism
•    Human Animality and Social Darwinism
•    Animal Commodification and Capitalism
•    Race, Class, Sex and Gender
•    Religion, Myth and Animism
•    Wildlife, Imperialism and Hunting
•    Pets, Companion Species and Domestic Animals
•    Biology, Ethology, Ecology and the Natural Sciences
•    Animal Performance, Circuses and Zoos
•    Animal Trauma, Violence and Warfare
•    Extinction and the Anthropocene
•    Livestock, Agriculture and Working Animals
•    Meat Production and the Animal Industry
•    Vegetarianism, Veganism and Eating Animals
•    Modernist Animal Philosophy
•    Humanism, Posthumanism and Transhumanism
•    Early- and Late- Modernist Animals 

Papers
Individual papers should be no more than twenty minutes in length. Please send an abstract of 300 words and a brief biography to beastlymodernisms@gmail.com by 31 January 2019.  

Panels
We welcome proposals for panels or roundtables of 3 to 4 speakers. Please send an abstract of 500 words and speaker biographies to beastlymodernisms@gmail.com by 31 January 2019

Submissions are open to all researchers at every level of study. We particularly encourage submissions from postgraduate researchers.

cfp-beastly-modernism

Call for abstracts: 6th Conference of the European Association for Critical Animal Studies (Barcelona, Spain)

Rethinking revolution: Nonhuman animals, antispeciesism and power 6th Conference of the European Association for Critical Animal Studies (EACAS)

Barcelona, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Campus Poblenou, 22-24 May 2019

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 15 December 2018

International conference at Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, hosted by:

  • The European Association for Critical Animal Studies
  • The UPF-Centre for Animal Ethics
  • The CRITICC Research Group
  • The Department of Communication

Location:

Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Department of Communication – Poblenou Campus

Roc Boronat, 138 – Barcelona 08108 – Catalonia – Spain

Website: eventum.upf.edu/go/EACAS2019

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Conference theme

Although human exploitation of nonhuman animals is by no means a modern development, it has grown exponentially in the last century. It is under capitalism that human abuse of their power over nonhuman animals has reached a massive scale, with a corresponding massive worsening of its consequences. This includes the suffering of trillions of sentient beings exploited in miserable conditions and killed for trivial purposes in the majority of cases, but also the massive contribution to global warming of industries like agribusiness, as well as the negative impact these practices have on social justice, intra-human violence and human health. The animal liberation movement therefore not only calls for justice and compassion for nonhuman animals, but also confront the results of industrial capitalism and modernity with a radical consciousness-raising claim. This claim is radical because it provides the most accurate condemnation of privilege and the status quo by revealing how inequality does not exist only at the intra-species level, but also at the inter-species level, and that both levels are closely interlinked and thus ought to be addressed jointly.

In the spirit of the field of Critical Animal Studies, the aim of this conference is to encourage scholars, students and activists to rethink the revolution that animal liberation theory represents since its inception in the 1970s, a social movement bringing the fight against oppression to its logical conclusion.

The conference welcomes proposals from a variety of scholars and disciplines – including critical academics, independent researchers, students and activists – reflecting on the intersecting themes of the conference: power, total liberation and antispeciesism.

Other themes

The conference also welcomes papers focused on any topic critically addressing nonhuman animals’ exploitation from a social science or humanities perspective, including but not limited to the following themes:

  • Animal advocacy and activism
  • Animal ethics
  • Animal law
  • Animal liberation
  • Animal liberation as a social movement
  • Animal oppression and intersectionality
  • Animal rights
  • Animal sanctuaries studies
  • Critical animal and media studies
  • Culture-Nature dualism and its criticism
  • Ethology and social perceptions of animals
  • Interspecies justice
  • Multispecies politics
  • Nonhuman animals and ableism
  • Nonhuman animals and agency
  • Nonhuman animals and capitalism
  • Nonhuman animals and colonialism
  • Nonhuman animals and communication
  • Nonhuman animals and critical race studies
  • Nonhuman animals and critical theory
  • Nonhuman animals and feminisms
  • Nonhuman animals and queer studies
  • Nonhuman animals and oppression theories
  • Nonhuman animals and political theory
  • Nonhuman animals and social class
  • Nonhuman animals and social justice
  • Nonhuman animals and social theory
  • Nonhuman animals, language and representation
  • Normative aspects of animal liberation
  • Vegan studies

The conference encourages the approach of critical animal studies and non-speciesist perspectives on all sorts of discrimination, oppression and abuse towards farmed animals, animals in labs and animals in entertainment, among others, including animals living in the wild.

Submission guidelines

All abstracts must be written in English.

Abstracts should include:

  • Abstract Title of 30 words maximum
  • Abstract Text of 500 words maximum
  • A brief biography of the author (150 words maximum) including name, affiliation and contact details

The number of submitted abstracts per author is limited to two.

Abstracts must be submitted to: cae@upf.edu

We strongly encourage submissions by women and other socially underrepresented groups.

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Start of Abstract Submission: 17 September 2018
  • Deadline for submission of abstracts: 15 December 2018
  • Decisions on abstracts will be notified by: 15 January 2019
  • Online registration opens (compulsory): 15 January 2019
  • Deadline for online registration: 15 April 2019
  • Conference opens: 22 May  2019
  • Conference closes: 24 May 2019

Registration fees:

  • Normal:    50€
  • Reduced: 25€ (for students, unemployed people or individuals with a low income).

Other information:

  • Attendance certificates will be handed out at the end of the conference.
  • All sessions will be held in English with the exception of one round table with Spanish and Catalan animal advocates.
  • All the food offered at the conference will be vegan (free lunch and coffee breaks)
  • Optional self-pay dinner: There will be a social event on Thursday night

For more information about the conference, or to submit an abstract, please email the organizing committee at: cae@upf.edu

Website: eventum.upf.edu/go/EACAS2019

Conference on Animal Rights in Europe (PRAGUE)

The Conference on Animal Rights in Europe (CARE) is taking place in Prague this year! CARE is an international conference aimed at connecting and inspiring animal rights groups throughout Europe.

Early bird registration: until the 22nd of July 2018 (this Sunday).

The conference is a chance to meet and grow with organizations and individuals both new and established. This will be an opportunity to meet minds, exchange ideas, and share strategies to strengthen the cause as a whole.

This is an extremely critical time for the cause – as more inhumane industry sweeps across Europe, more action and education is necessary. Animals are not the only ones who benefit from this movement – humans and the environment do too. We encourage powerful activists and participants from all realms to participate in the event.

More information on https://careconf.eu/

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Call For Papers: ‘Animal Machines / Machine Animals’.

We would like to announce the details and call for papers for the British Animal Studies Network Autumn conference, entitled ‘Animal Machines / Machine Animals’.

The conference will take place on the 2nd and 3rd November, and is organised by the Life Geographies Group of the University of Exeter.

As well as a number of invited speakers (to be announced) we are also issuing this call for papers. If you are interested in giving a paper addressing the topic from whatever disciplinary perspective please submit an abstract of no more than 200 words with a brief biography (also of no more than 200 words). Please send them to R.Gorman@exeter.ac.uk and G.f.Davies@exeter.ac.uk.

The deadline for abstracts is Friday 29 June 2018. Presentations will be 20 minutes long, and we hope to include work by individuals at different career stages. Sadly we have no money to support travel, accommodation or attendance costs.

Meeting fees will be £25 for unwaged and £50 for waged attendees.

As with all previous BASN meetings, this one takes as its focus a key issue in animal studies that it is hoped will be of interest to scholars from a range of disciplines and to those working outside of academia. Topics covered at this meeting might include (but are not limited to):

  • The (re)shaping of human-animal relations through (ideas about) machines.
  • Animal-machine interactions, hybridities, and co-constitutions.
  • Ways of thinking across machines and animals in relation to ontology, epistemology, and ethics.
  • Animal bodies, agencies, and autonomies within mechanised systems.
  • The role of machines in facilitating and co-producing experiences and engagements with non-human animals.
  • Augmented and machinic animals in art, literature, and film.
  • The ontological and affective aspects of ‘robotic pets’ and other animal-machine hybrids.

We welcome papers that deal with the theme of ‘Machine Animals / Animal Machines’ in both contemporary and historical settings, and would especially like to see papers that address these issues from contexts outside the UK. Papers are welcomed from across animal studies, including disciplines such as (but not limited to) geography, anthropology, sociology, literary studies, art history, history, science and technology studies, ethology, psychology, behavioural sciences and ecology, bioscience/biomedical research.

For further details of the British Animal Studies Network go to http://www.britishanimalstudiesnetwork.org.uk

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